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Home Office - "Teen Violence / Boy" - RKCR/Y&R

  • Teen Violence / Boy
  • Home Office
  • The Home Office
  • RKCR/Y&R
  • United Kingdom
  • Teen Violence
Product CategoryAnti-Domestic Violence, Sexual Abuse
MarketUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Date of First Broadcast/PublicationFebruary 15, 2010
Media TypeTelevision
Awards British Arrows, 2011 (Shortlist) for Public Service Advertising
Post Production The Mill London
Production Company Tomboy Films
Creative Director Damon Collins
Art Director James Manning
Copywriter David Martin
Director Shane Meadows
Producer Barnaby Spurrier
Account Director Nick Fokes
Account Planner Lucy Howard
Account Planner Rebecca Fleming
Agency Producer Matt Keen
Account Manager Jane Redfern
Account Manager Sophie Ford-Masters
Editor Richard Graham
Advertising Manager Jo Bray
If you could see yourself would you stop yourself?

Story

As part of the Home Office's new initiative to tackle Violence Against Women and Girls, the campaign aims to empower teenagers to recognise the signs of abuse, stimulate discussion of the issue and seek help and advice.

Concept

The campaign addresses uses these insights to confront teenagers with the truth about abusive behaviour and empower them to doing something about it. Two separate versions of each execution have been produced, to ensure that the campaign speaks to both boys and girls in a non-accusatory or judgemental way.

Problem

In the UK, 1 in 4 women will be a victim of domestic abuse over the course of her life*. Shockingly, research showed that teenagers have a significant tolerance towards this form of abuse; with 43% of young people believing that it’s acceptable for a boyfriend to be aggressive under certain circumstances**. Attitudes adopted now will shape the futures of these young people. What’s more, putting up with abuse as a teenager makes you disproportionately likely to become an adult victim.