SapientNitro North America, Boston Follow Update

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Jeep Brand - "Jeep.com Redesign" - SapientNitro North America

  • Jeep.com Redesign
  • Jeep Brand
  • Chrysler Group LLC
  • SapientNitro North America
  • United States
  • Jeep.com Redesign
Product CategoryAutomotive
More Informationhttp://www.jeep.com
LanguageEnglish
Date of First Broadcast/Publication2012
Media TypeWeb Site
Associate Creative Director Ryan Hryciuk
Associate Creative Director Deepak Mehmi
Associate Creative Director Steve Koch
Associate Creative Director Gary Alexander
Art Director Mikhail St-Denis
Art Director Sebastian Speier
Art Director David Fasullo
Art Director Ryan Otake
Copywriter Lee Ekstrom
Copywriter Jen Hodrodge
Project Manager Viktor Bezic
Project Manager Ronald Tsang
Project Manager Tomasz Poraszka
Project Manager Christian Schoepke
Project Manager Janey Kastanis
Designer Laura Schaefer
Designer Yaga Kielb
Designer Joseph Gatto
Interactive Development Kevin Ronald
Interactive Development Monika Piotrowicz
Interactive Development Noel Tibbles
Interactive Development Bartel Welch
Interactive Development Brett Kellgren
Information Architect Michael MacLennan
Information Architect Jason Wasiak
      Copywriter Michael Wong
      Information Architect Rob Brenneman
Lead Programmer Rama Annaswamy

Story

The online Jeep brand needed a refresh. The existing Jeep.com, though visually elaborate, was utterly non-functional. It relied heavily on the usage of (nearly obsolete) Flash and incorporated crushingly heavy and detailed photography. As well, the site was a collision of the former site's functional experiences buried under a sensationalized homepage. The client's request was to bring the majority of Jeep.com's user experience under a clean, consistent and utilitarian umbrella. 

The team began with analytics to determine the order, priority and direction of the key directions for users on the site. This provided a lens of clarity to observe what feature content and calls-to-action were most engaging for the audience. As well, the client desired both the vehicle pages and homepage to convey a sense of equality and symmetry among the nameplates. As such, the new homepage was designed to showcase each nameplate effectively and equally-and to highlight the deviations in pricing and provide users with dynamic offers based on zip code. We soon learned that the vehicle carousel was the most direct way to drive users deeper into vehicle content and shopping-tool conversion. This new interaction paradigm removed the burden from the global navigation and began to drive nearly 25% of the traffic to vehicle-centric pages.

As well, the metrics indicated that more users were interacting with and calling the site through mobile and tablet. This presented a clear problem with the previous site's heavy use of the Flash. We concluded that any new site had to be enabled for smartphone and tablet users. As such, everything developed on the new Jeep.com used HTML5 and Javascript. All of the Flash was subsequently removed from Jeep.com. In fact, on the Vehicle Landing Pages we were able to build an exterior 360-degree view completely in Javascript using 3D renders of the vehicles. As well, other delightful tidbits were added to the Vehicle Landing Page experience; users could select the nameplate trims they wanted and see its available colors, offers and pricing. The page below-the-fold followed an editorial-style layout to provide context for users around the core pillars of the brand. This way we could showcase a feature and create a more holistic story for each nameplate. Now, each page ends with a pay-off-driving the user to continue his or her experience with a Shopping Tool or to Locate A Dealer.

Another rationale for revamping the Capabilities section of the site was to help emphasize the core capacities of the Jeep brand. We provided an overarching narrative around what the vehicles could uniquely do-and what an achievement it was to be Trail Rated®. We provided users with a selection tool to discover which vehicles, with which capability, could conquer specific terrains. We noticed that users who completed the Trail Rated® Comparison selection tool were twice as likely to complete and convert on Shopping Tools (like: Build & Price, Payment Calculator or Search New Inventory).

Finally, we focused on wayfinding and spotlighting in redefining the site hierarchy. This was embodied in an entirely new global navigation system that reinforced core behaviors of learning about the vehicles-and then actually shopping for one. The nav used multiple indicators to show clearly where a user was within the multiple layers of Jeep.com. We thus did away with a reliance on breadcrumbs. 

Execution & Use of Media

By focusing on conventional shopping behaviors, we were able to present content in a fashion conducive to a genuine vehicle purchase. Longer scrolling pages and proper development frameworks enabled smartphone and tablet browsing and shopping interactions. We are still slowly migrating from Flash; Each video on Jeep.com is doubly accessible from social media through a YouTube imbed.

Page weight is always a pressing consideration for Jeep online. Finding the proper balance of high-resolution imagery along with palatable load times is a delicate balance to achieve. However, based on metrics and JD Power review, the site contains a higher-than-average number of elements yet is among the leaders for quickest load time.

We have strived for, and achieved, a healthy equality between efficiency, speed and utility.

Results and ROI

  •  Higher than average and anticipated vehicle sales thus far in 2012 – 105% of targets
  • Jeep.com moved up from ranked 17 to number 7 in the JD Power Automotive Assessment for Website Excellence – the highest jump of any site assessed that quarter
  • Conversion rates of Shopping Tool activity increased
  • Time on site increased
  • Abandon rates declined