M&C Saatchi Abel, Cape Town & Johannesburg Follow Update

  • Cape Town Media Quarter, 5th Floor Cnr Somerset Road & De Smit Street. De Waterkant Cape Town 8005 Johannesburg Block D, Unit 1 152 Ann Crescent Sandton Gauteng 2196
  • Cape Town & Johannesburg
  • South Africa
  • Phone: (+27) CPT: 021 421 1024 / JHB:011 263 3900
  • Fax: (+27) CPT: 021 418 5680 / JHB: 0866 364 4553

WHEAT - "Stop Judging. Start Helping." - M&C Saatchi Abel

  • Stop Judging. Start Helping.
  • WHEAT
  • WHEAT
  • M&C Saatchi Abel
  • South Africa
  • Stop Judging. Start Helping.
Product CategoryInstitutional/Public Interest/Non-Profit Org.
More Informationhttp://www.wheattrust.co.za
Date of First Broadcast/PublicationJanuary 1, 2013
Media TypeCase Study
Length207 Seconds
Executive Creative Director Gordon Ray
Creative Director Sonja Fahn
Art Director Sonja Fahn
Copywriter Kayli Vee Levitan
Copywriter Carien Eloff
Producer Bronwyn Henry
Account Manager Sarah McDonald
Business Director Wouter Lombard
Photographer Gerda Genis
Stop Judging. Start Helping.

Story

We identified 3 famous South African women, who have been stereotyped through their career, to use their status in magazine environments where they would usually appear. Only this time, their exposure came with a very surprising message, addressing the stereotypes they are known for.

We used this superficial environment of beauty, glamour and style within the magazine to shame other women into participating and supporting a worthy cause. They could do this by means of a simple sms donation.

Concept

The concept of the campaign relied solely on the power of provocative headlines to capture the attention of the reader. The 3 selected female celebrities had to agree to address their stereotypes head-on. No euphemisms, no compliments, as without these thought-provoking words, the campaign would merely have resulted in typical “celebrity/fashion wallpaper” executions – nothing to remember or take note of.

As a result, each execution then highlighted the very judgmental nature of women and inviting them to Stop Judging, and rather Start Helping. Examples of bold headlines used:
• Minki vd Westhuizen: BIMBO. Fake. Shallow. Vain. Call me what you like. I go to bed at night knowing that I support other women. Stop Judging. Start Helping.
• Christina Storm: MEDIA WHORE. Self-Obsessed. Insincere. Drama Queen. To me your labelling doesn't make a difference. But the support I give other women does.
• Khayi Mbau: BITCH. Man-crazy. Publicity-Hungry. Gold digger. I've heard it all. While you're busy calling me names, I'm busy helping other women. Stop Judging. Start Helping.

Following these provocative headlines, the bodycopy then explained more about WHEAT and asked readers to help make a difference by donating via sms. 

Problem

• South Africans have become apathetic towards people asking for donations – there's not a street corner or a parking spot these days where one would not encounter yet another desperate plea for money.
• The advertising space donated to WHEAT were mainly in lifestyle & fashion titles, aimed at women. The typical "please donate to this worthy cause" messaging would easily become wallpaper in an already cluttered (and somewhat superficial) environment. 

Result

We identified 3 famous South African women, who have been stereotyped through their career, to use their status in magazine environments where they would usually appear. Only this time, their exposure came with a very surprising message, addressing the stereotypes they are known for. The following 3 female celebrities featured, agreed to participate in our campaign for free:
• Minki vd Westhuizen was voted FHM 100 Sexiest Women in the World poll by South African FHM readers and in 2003 she was even voted the most popular pin-up girl by US troops serving in the Iraq War
• Christina Storm is a famous TV Actress, model and even reality series contestant
• Khanyi Mbau is a self-made socialite, TV acress and talk-show host. 

Soon after the campaign broke, the Client informed the Agency that they received donations (directly as a result of the print advertising) to the value of R80,000 already.
Unfortunately this was not tracked further, as WHEAT started implementing the sms codes on all their various channels to drive donations - and as a result the print component could not be isolated from the rest of their donation activities.