Perspectives: Women in Advertising: Lindsey Slaby, Strategic Brand Manager, Sunday Dinner

In honor of International Women’s Day, AdForum is showcasing the achievements of women in advertising in the month of March through a series of interviews.

Lindsey Slaby
Lindsey Slaby
Strategic Brand Marketing Advisor Sunday Dinner

Q: How would you describe the overall culture at your agency and would you say that there is a separate female culture?
Lindsey Slaby
Lindsey Slaby: I run a consultancy. Throughout the past few years it's been all different sizes, but always with women, often as employees. What I have learned is that smart driven women thrive best when they are in partnership vs a culture of employment. The culture of Sunday Dinner is about bringing the right people together to collaborate. To me, the business opportunity is for SD to be a banner for a diverse set of women to come together in business & in lifestyle. My long term vision is for the brand to be a platform for rockstar females to find their voice as an entrepreneur, feel support from our established systems, and create their own dream lifestyle business under our banner. I want the culture to feel empowered in a financial structure where friendships can still flourish and we operate as business women who lean on each other to create in fun & innovative ways.
Q: What do you see as being the biggest change in the advertising industry since women have begun to break the “glass ceiling”?
Lindsey Slaby
Lindsey Slaby: In my first year running my own company, I felt the pressure of a male-dominated industry in ways I had never experienced. I realized then just how important my network of strong females would be in my career. A missing perspective of the 'glass ceiling' conversation tends to be the way women treat each other on their way up. Often times, they are the last to respect each other. They are quick to look down on each other and point out weaknesses vs offer praises and lift each other up. As women continue to climb the ranks, I believe we need to find ways to continue to show support to each other.
Q: What steps do you take to ensure you achieve a healthy work-life balance?
Lindsey Slaby
Lindsey Slaby: Ha! Well… anyone who knows me thinks if there were 26 hours in a day, I would work all of those hours. Last fall I blew all of my financial goals out of the water. Success. On paper. But I made a lot of personal and health trade-offs. It caused me to take a huge step back to re-evaluate what is important to me and reconnect with my personal passions. As an entrepreneur, you are driven to create a business and that is a big piece of your life. It provides you with joy. And it’s joy you want to celebrate with those you love. If you aren't truly committing to your personal life, it's all for naught. I can’t say I am the best at balance, but I am consciously trying and I have strong women around me who constantly put me in check. And yoga. They make me do yoga.
Q: What professional achievement are you most proud of?
Lindsey Slaby
Lindsey Slaby: Starting a company. It's hard. It's lonely. It's massively rewarding. It's exhilarating. And you learn so much about yourself. I encourage anyone who has a bone in their body that says "you should really start your own thing," to do it. Take the leap. You have nothing to lose and so much to gain.
Q: Tell us about a mentor that helped guide you in your career. What made them so special?
Lindsey Slaby
Lindsey Slaby: Kristin Bloomquist + Marshall Ross were a mentorship team at C-K that guided me to be where I am today. These two set a high bar for how to behave as an executive and provide leadership. Most likely the busiest people at my agency, every meeting with either one of them and you felt like you were the most important & only thing they had going on. They also thought me is the value of a business coach. Great executives don’t get there on their own, they have support and outlets to help them continue to get better. I am forever grateful for their mentorship and commitment to my personal development. When you find someone willing to offer time to support you, grab onto it.
 

Tell us your perspective as a woman in advertising.