Mitchell

Fayetteville, United States

Contact Information

2 North College Avenue
Fayetteville Arkansas 72701
United States
Phone: (+1) 479.443.4673
Email:

John  Gilboy

John Gilboy

Chief Development Officer

Gracie Ziegler


Basic Info

Core Competencies: Full Service, Digital, Public Relations, Media Buying/Planning, Crisis Communication

Founded in: 1995

Network:

Employees: 93

Awards: 4

Clients: 22

Core Competencies: Full Service, Digital, Public Relations, Media Buying/Planning, Crisis Communication

Founded in: 1995

Network:

Employees: 93

Awards: 4

Clients: 22

Mitchell

2 North College Avenue
Fayetteville Arkansas 72701
United States
Phone: (+1) 479.443.4673
Email:
John  Gilboy

John Gilboy

Chief Development Officer

Gracie Ziegler

Sarah Clark Champions The Energy And Innovation Of Diversity

SARAH CLARK Headshot 2017_square-1

This article was originally published on Forbes.com on March 28, 2019.

As building diverse workforces and diverse workplaces becomes more important, I want to profile business leaders who have been thoughtful and intentional in creating workplaces that embrace different people, needs, and skill sets.

This interview features Sarah Clark, the CEO ofMitchell, an integrated PR firm that creates connections between businesses, brands, and people through strategic insights, customized conversations, and consumer engagement. Clark has more than 25 years of experience incorporate communicationsand a strong track record of protecting corporate reputations and redefining perceptions in key areas of business.

Sarah Clark recognizes the value of diversity — but also recognizes that it can't exist as an "initiative." SARAH CLARK

Serenity Gibbons:What responsibility, if any, do you feel leaders have regarding building diverse workplaces?

Sarah Clark:Culture comes from the top down, as well as the bottom up, which means leaders must drive and nurture diversity from every angle. First, though, they must see people as people, not as titles, colors, genders, etc. True inclusion can only exist whendiversitybecomes so woven into the organization’s fabric that it’s an everyday expectation, not a seasonal or annual initiative.

The good news is that the majority of leaders understand their responsibility to promote equality and inclusion. However, many have not learned how to move their workforce from seeing diversity as a badge or a quota to helping team members genuinely value one another’s unique backgrounds, experiences, and skill sets.