Interactive Digital Billboards

Use of facial recognition to raise awareness about domestic violence

For International Women's Day, WCRS has teamed up with Women's Aid and Ocean Outdoor to address the issue of domestic violence through digital interactive billboards. When people are paying attention to the billboards, the women's bruises start to disappear, in order to demonstrate that we shouldn't turn a blind eye to domestic violence.

TitleLook At Me (Case Study)
Campaign Look At Me
Advertiser Women's Aid
Brand Women's Aid

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Business SectorSubscribers Only
Media Type Interactive Outdoor Experience
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Creative Team M..e Subscribers Only
Creative Team ..n Ro....on Subscribers Only
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Women’s Aid Federation Northern Ireland has launched a suite of new digital outdoor ads across Belfast carrying the powerful message that, physical or not, abuse is abuse and can be prosecuted.

St Patrick’s Day crowds across Belfast will see digital billboards showing abusive phrases painfully imprinted on a woman’s skin.

The expressions – “who else would want you?”, “you belong to me”, “it’s your fault” – are all phrases that are frequently reported in cases of emotional abuse.

Emotional abuse is a pattern of behaviour designed to intimidate, frighten and control a partner. It is illegal and perpetrators can be prosecuted, but awareness of this is disturbingly low and, as a result, many cases go unreported.

The work, created by WCRS, aims to combat that by challenging people to report abuse in whatever form it takes, even if it doesn’t leave a physical mark.

The photography was crafted using 3D-printed stamps and anonymous volunteer models. It was shot by Kai Bastard and the makeup was done by Bill Turpin.

It will run for one week on Bravo Outdoor’s premium outdoor sites around Belfast.

Jan Melia, CEO of Women’s Aid Northern Ireland, said: “Emotional abuse is harder to see. Our hope is that this work will bring attention to this, kick starting a campaign to raise awareness and letting victims know there is support for them.”

Christopher Ringsell, Creative Director at WCRS, said: “Physically creating these messages of control and showing them debossed onto the skin of our female bodies helps to highlight this emotional form of abuse in a visually powerful way, hopefully encouraging victims to reach out knowing there is support for them.”