View Point: Super Bowl Javier Campopiano, Saatchi & Saatchi NY

"As a latino, to name one case, I don´t really see ourselves represented enough in the commercials."

 

Javier Campopiano
SVP Chief Creative Officer Saatchi & Saatchi US & Latin America Saatchi & Saatchi
In a few words, can you tell us who you are and what your job title is?
Javier Campopiano, Chief Creative Officer, Saatchi & Saatchi NY.
The current price for a 30 second slot is over $5 million. In your opinion is the spend worth it?
I am originally from Argentina, where our currency exchange is 1 dollar: 20 Argentinian pesos. Therefore, for me these numbers will always feel exaggerated and hyperbolic. But when you think about it from an offer/demand stand point, brands are willing to pay because its one of the few occasions where you have millions of people actually caring about the commercial break. Sometimes even more than they care about the actual game. It´s unique, and as a foreigner, I can tell you it doesn´t happen anywhere else in the world.
Is there a demographic you believe Super Bowl advertisers have failed to target or a business sector that is underrepresented?
As a latino, to name one case, I don´t really see ourselves represented enough in the commercials. Not at all. Latino men and women embrace the big game event as much as any American does, but you would never guess that from the ads, aside from checking the "diverse casting" box. Of course, women are not reflected in the ads accordingly either. We know that the audience for last year´s game was 49% female, but the commercials are still highly targeted to men.
Who do you think is the ‘brand to watch’ at this year’s Super Bowl?
I am not that curious about any particular brand this year, maybe as a consequence of the early releases and pre-seeds that leave little room for surprises. Even though I understand the tactic, and agree that in some cases its the right thing to do to maximize the investment, it goes against a key element that I still value above all else: the moment where a lot of people are watching something for the first time, at the same time. Having said that, Skittles quirky approach -though totally on brand- with exclusive ad for one person grabbed my attention. And the teasers are brilliant.
Do you think advertisers can benefit from taking a political/social stance in the Super Bowl?
Only if they are actually doing something meaningful for the cause they are promoting or defending. These are not times to stand on behalf of a cause that you, as a company are not fully embracing, and we saw some really exemplary cases of self inflicted backlash due to that last year.
Are there any fumbled opportunities that come to mind when you think of past Super Bowl advertising?
Not a particular one, but I do have an overall feeling that classic storytelling, in the fashion of Darth Vader for VW, is slowly dissapearing from the big game. Amid all the celebrities and contests for biggest production ever, the absence of a simple compelling narrative, shot with taste and a strong sense of craft feels even bigger. This is actually the best possible stage for that kind of approach, as people are really paying attention to the ads, so one can be less simplistic and gimmicky. But most brands are doing the exact opposite, and we end up with tons of examples of bad writing executed against a huge budget.
Eagles or Patriots?
The Argentinean national futbol team.
What is your favorite Super Bowl ad of all time?
Hands down: Tide Talking Stain.
 

 

Javier Campopiano
SVP Chief Creative Officer Saatchi & Saatchi US & Latin America Saatchi & Saatchi